Rule 39C

AIREP


AIREP

What is AIREP? (To prepare for both Part 1 and Part 2 of RTR (A) exam)

An Aircraft Report is a report of actual weather conditions encountered by an aircraft while in flight. There are two types of reports. An AIREP is a routine, often automated report of in-flight weather conditions such as wind and temperature. A PIREP is reported by a pilot to indicate encounters of hazardous weather such as icing or turbulence. Both are transmitted in real-time via radio to a ground station.

PIREPs and AIREPs are encoded differently.

A pilot report or PIREP is a report of actual weather conditions encountered by an aircraft in flight. This information is usually relayed by radio to the nearest ground station, but other options (e.g. electronic submission) also exist in some regions. The message would then be encoded and relayed to other weather offices and air traffic service units.

Although the actual form used to record the PIREP may differ from one country to another, the standards and criteria will remain almost the same. At a minimum the PIREP must contain a header, aircraft location, time, flight level, aircraft type and one other field.

In recent years, a PIREP will also include UA or UUA used to identify the PIREP as routine or urgent.

AIREP Content

The AIREP is divided into three sections, the first always sent, the others only sent when required.

Section 1 – Position Information

• Aircraft identification

• Position

• Time

• Flight level or altitude

• Next position and ETA

Section 2 – Operational Information

• Estimated time of arrival

• Endurance

Section 3 – Meteorological Information

• Air temperature

• Wind

• Turbulence

• Aircraft icing

• Supplementary information

When a special AIREP of pre-eruption volcanic activity, a volcanic eruption or volcanic ash cloud is transmitted, the content and order in the AIREP message is:

• Aircraft identification

• Position

• Time

• Flight level or altitude

• Volcanic activity observed

• Air temperature

• Wind

• Supplementary information

Routine Met Observations

Routine met observations are made at ATS reporting points roughly an hour apart or when requested.

An aircraft is exempted from making routine observations when:

a) The flight duration is 2 hours or less.

b) The aircraft is within an hour of landing.

c) The aircraft is below 1500 m (5000 ft).

Because position reports are omitted when under radar control and radar control is the norm over land this tends to mean that routine position reports contain met information mostly when operating in oceanic areas.

e.g

“NAGPUR CONTROL INDAIR 430, AIR REPORT INDAIR 430, POSITION NIPAD 0500, FL 310,  ESTIMATING KINKI 0530, ETA KOLKATA 0600, AIR TEMPERATURE MINUS 20 DEGREES, SPOT WIND 180 DEGREES  20 KNOTS, SKY CLEAR EXPERIENCING MILD TURBULENCE”

NOTE : POSITION AND THREE ELEMENTS OF WEATHER IS TO BE GIVEN

STICK TO WHAT YOU HAVE PREPARED.  ADD IF ANYTHING IS GIVEN IN QUESTION PAPER LIKE EXPERIENCING TURBULENCE
The term “OVER” at the end of the transmission indicates an HF position report.

OVER = My transmission is ended and I expect a response from you.

OUT = This exchange of transmission is ended and no response is expected.

“OVER” and “OUT” are not normally used in VHF communications, these are HF terms.

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